(Source: shygesture)

(Reblogged from rokuroku)

aymerydelamaisonfort:

Georges Braque, lithograph for Guillaume Apollinaire, Si je moriais là-bas. Paris: Louis Broder, 1962. One of fifty copies on vélin pur chiffon du Moulin d’Ambert, with suite on Japan nacré, individually signed by the artist. Via

(Reblogged from dreaminginthedeepsouth)
One should say before sleeping, “I have lived many lives. I have been a slave and a prince. Many a beloved had sat upon my knees and I have sat upon the knees of many a beloved. Everything that has been shall be again.
W.B. Yeats (via stxxz)
(Reblogged from transientrandom)

theantidote:

Elogio del Martes… (by sonia…….)

un pasito más y el lunes será pasado,
es que hay lunes… y lunes,

(Reblogged from theantidote)
I keep coming back to seeing and knowing that one of the prerequisites of wisdom is the experience of the preciousness of each moment.
D.R. Butler (via shaktilover)
(Reblogged from dreaminginthedeepsouth)

kafkasapartment:

Circles in a Circle, 1923. Vasily Kandinsky (1866 - 1944). Oil on canvas

(Reblogged from michaelfunderburk)
For a long time, memory researchers assumed that memories were like volumes stored in a library. When your brain remembered something, it was simply searching through the stacks and then reading aloud from whatever passage it discovered. But some scientists now believe that memories effectively get rewritten every time they’re activated, thanks to a process called reconsolidation. To create a synaptic connection between two neurons the associative link that is at the heart of all neuronal learning you need protein synthesis. Studies on rats suggest that if you block protein synthesis during the execution of learned behavior pushing a lever to get food, for instance the learned behavior disappears. It appears that instead of simply recalling a memory that had been forged days or months ago, the brain is forging it all over again, in a new associative context. In a sense, when we remember something, we create a new memory, one that is shaped by the changes that have happened to our brain since the memory last occurred to us.

Slate Magazine, “The Science of Eternal Sunshine by Steven, March 22, 2004

(via evoketheforms)

(Reblogged from youaremycondition)

artpropelled:

Robilee Frederick

(Source: rulingthumb)

(Reblogged from dreaminginthedeepsouth)
Bryan Christie
*
"While taking Anatomy in Motion with Gary Ward, I am again reminded how making the subtlest correction can have a global impact. This is the key to excellence in treating our clients/patients. We must find the underlying cause of dysfunction and introduce the least amount of correction. The genius that is our unconscious mind will do the rest.”
~ David Weinstock

Bryan Christie

*

"While taking Anatomy in Motion with Gary Ward, I am again reminded how making the subtlest correction can have a global impact. This is the key to excellence in treating our clients/patients. We must find the underlying cause of dysfunction and introduce the least amount of correction. The genius that is our unconscious mind will do the rest.”

~ David Weinstock

liquidnight:

Alvin Langdon Coburn

Williamsburg Bridge, New York, 1909

Photogravure

From The Photography Book by Phaidon

(Reblogged from liquidnight)